Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Scores on symptom inventories

StudyPhillips (1967): study US NewHampshire 1962 /1
TitleMental Health Status, Social Participation and Happiness.
SourceJournal of Health and Social Behavior, 1967, Vol. 8, 285 -291
Public21+ aged, general public, New Hampshire, USA, 196?
Sample
Non-Response1%
Respondents N =593

Correlate
Author's labelMental health
Page in Source 288
Our classificationScores on symptom inventories
Operationalization
Twenty-two Item Screening Score of psychiatric symptoms 
indicating impairment. (Langner, 1962)

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-HL-u-sq-v-3-aG=+.39 p < .01
Unaffected by age, S.E.S. and sex


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-HL-u-sq-v-3-aSelfreport on single question:

Taking all together: how happy would you say you are? Would you say you are?
3 very happy
2 pretty happy
1 not too happy


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
GGOODMAN & Kruskal's GAMMA
Type: test statistic
Measurement level: Correlate: ordinal, Happinessl: ordinal
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
G = 0 no rank correlation
G = +1 strongest possible rank correlation, where high correlate values correspond to high happiness ratings.
G = -1 strongest possible rank correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness ratings.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl