Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Household income

StudyEasterlin (2001): study US 1994
TitleIncome and Happiness: Towards a Unified Theory.
SourceThe Economic Journal, 2001, Vol. 111, 465 - 484
URLhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/2667943
PublicAdults, general public, USA, 1994
SampleProbability simple random sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =2627

Correlate
Author's labelHousehold Income
Page in Source 468
Our classificationHousehold income
Operationalization
Total household income in US Dollars
1. Less than 10.000
2. 10-19.999
3. 20-29.999
3. 30-39.999
4. 40-49.999
5. 50-74.999
6. 75.000 and over

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-HL-c-sq-v-3-aaDM=+
> 10.000   M = 1,8 
10-19.999  M = 2,1
20-29.999  M = 2,3
30-39.999  M = 2,5
40-49.999  M = 2,4
50-74.999  M = 2,6
<75.000    M = 2,8


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-HL-c-sq-v-3-aaSelfreport on single question:

Taken all together, how would you say things are these days? Would you say that you are....?
3 very happy
2 pretty happy
1 not too happy


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
DMDIFFERENCE of MEANS
Type: descriptive statistic only.
Measurement level: Correlate: dichotomous, Happiness: metric
Range: depending on the happiness rating scale of the author; range symmetric about zero.

Meaning: the difference of the mean happiness, as measured on the author's rating scale, between the two correlate levels.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl