Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Standard of living in the nation

StudyBjornskov et al. (2010): study ZZ 1981
TitleFormal Institutions and Subjective Well-Being: Revisiting the Cross-Country Evidence.
SourceEuropean Journal of Political Economy, 2010, Vol. 26, 419 -430
DOIDOI:10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2010.03.001
Public18+ aged, general public, 55 nations, 1981-2004
SampleProbability multi-stage cluster sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =135000

Correlate
Author's labelInvestment price level
Page in Source 12, 30, 32
Our classificationStandard of living in the nation
Operationalization
Not reported
Observed distributionM=0,864 SD=0,294

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-SLW-c-sq-n-10-a
AVERAGE happiness by investment price level in 
nations
O-SLW-c-sq-n-10-ab=+.69 p < .05
All nations (N=55)
O-SLW-c-sq-n-10-ab=+1.1 p < .01
Rich nations (GDP per capita => 8000 USD, N=34)

B's controlled for
-average membership of voluntary organizations
-social trust
-belief in god
-divorce rate
-unemployment rate
-post-communism
-openness to trade
-honest and efficient government
-regional and period dummies


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-SLW-c-sq-n-10-aSelfreport on single question:

All things considered, how satisfied are you with your life as-a-whole these days?
1 dissatisfied
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 satisfied


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
bREGRESSION COEFFICIENT (non-standardized) by LEAST SQUARES (OLS)
Type: test statistic
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Theoretical range: unlimited

Meaning:
b > 0 A higher correlate level corresponds with a higher happiness rating on average.
B < 0 A higher correlate level corresponds with a lower happiness rating on average.
B = 0 Not any correlation with the relevant correlate.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl