Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Attitudes to one's possessions

StudyLee et al. (2002): study US 1997
TitleDeveloping a Subjective Measure of Consumers Well-Being.
SourceJournal of Macromarketing, 2002, Vol. 22, 158 - 169
DOIDOI:10.1177/0276146702238219
Public18+ aged, students, USA, 199?
SampleNon-probability purposive sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =298

Correlate
Author's labelSatisfaction with possessions
Page in Source 164
Our classificationAttitudes to one's possessions
Operationalization
Selfreport on 6 questions: 

If you own any of the following items, please indicate 
the extent to which you are satisfied/dissatisied with 
possessing or owning them. 

a. House or condominium
b. Consumer electronis (CD player, TV, VCR, computers, 
etc.)
c. Furniture and/or appliances
d. Private transportation (cars, trucks, 
motorcycles,and bicycles)
e. clothing accessories, and jewelry
f. Savings and investments

Rated:
1=awful
2=bad
3=unsatisfactory
4=neutral
5=satisfactory
6=good
7=wonderful
0=no opinion, missing value

Composite index is average of 6 formative single 
indicators.
Remarks
Interview instructions:
Note that persons might like owning something - a 
classic car or a piece of property - even though thay 
never use it. Or they might be pleased both to own and 
to use the thing. On these items, indicate only how you 
feel about owning the item, not how you feel using or 
consuming it. Respond only to the items you own.

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-DT-u-sq-v-7-ar=+.82 p < .01
O-DT-u-sq-v-7-aBeta=+.49 p < .01
Beta controlled for satisfaction with:
- job
- family
- finance
- health
- education
- friendships
- leisure
- neighbors
- community
- spiritual
- taxes
- environment
- political situation
- housing
- cultural life
- social life

Unaffected by additional control for satisfaction 
with:
- acquisitions
- consumption
- repair services
- do-it-yourself repairs
- disposition
(consumer well-being)


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-DT-u-sq-v-7-aSelfreport on single question:

How do you feel about your life as a whole.....?
7 delighted
6 pleased
5 mostly satisfied
4 mixed
3 mostly dissatisfied
2 unhappy
1 terrible

Name: Andrews & Withey's `Delighted-Terrible Scale' (original version)


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
BetaSTANDARDIZED REGRESSION COEFFICIENT by LEAST SQUARES (OLS)
Type: test statistic.

Measurement level: Correlates: all metric, Happiness: metric.
Range: [-1 ; +1]

Meaning:
beta > 0 a higher correlate level corresponds to a higher happiness rating on average.
beta < 0 a higher correlate level corresponds to a higher happiness rating on average.
beta = 0 no correlation.
beta = + 1 or -1 perfect correlation.
rPRODUCT-MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (Also "Pearson's correlation coefficient' or simply 'correlation coefficient')
Type: test statistic.
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
r = 0 no correlation ,
r = 1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with high happiness values, and
r = -1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness values.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl