Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Attitude to vinicity

StudyPalisi & Canning (1986): study US 1974
TitleUrbanism and Psychological Well-Being: A Test of Three Theories.
SourceSociological Spectrum, 1986, Vol. 6, 361 - 378
DOIDOI: 10.1080/02732173.1986.9981797
Public18+ aged, general public, USA, 1974-1982
Sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =7542

Correlate
Author's labelSatisfaction derivedfrom the community
Page in Source 372
Our classificationAttitude to vinicity
Operationalization
Single closed question on satisfaction received from 
the city or place lived in, rated on a 7-point scale, 
ranging from "a very great deal" to "none" (order 
reversed).

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-HL-c-sq-v-3-aar=+.27


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-HL-c-sq-v-3-aaSelfreport on single question:

Taken all together, how would you say things are these days? Would you say that you are....?
3 very happy
2 pretty happy
1 not too happy


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
rPRODUCT-MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (Also "Pearson's correlation coefficient' or simply 'correlation coefficient')
Type: test statistic.
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
r = 0 no correlation ,
r = 1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with high happiness values, and
r = -1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness values.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl