Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Recent happiness (< 1 year ago)

StudyKross et al. (2013): study US 2008
TitleFacebook Use Predicts Declines in Subjective Well-Being in Young Adults.
SourceOpen Access, 2013, Plos One, Vol. 8, 1 - 7
URLhttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0069841
DOIDOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0069841
PublicFacebook users, Ann Arbor, Michigan, followed 14 days, USA, 2013
SampleNon-probability purposive sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =82

Correlate
Author's labelPre/Post life satisfaction
Page in Source Page 3
Our classificationRecent happiness (< 1 year ago)
Operationalization
Below are five statements that you may agree or 
disagree with. Using the 1 - 7 scale below, indicate 
your agreement with each item by placing the 
appropriate number on the line preceding that item. 
Please be open and honest in your responding.

_ In most ways my life is close to my ideal. 
_ The conditions of my life are excellent.
_ I am satisfied with my life.
_ So far I have gotten the important things I want in 
life.
_ If I could live my life over, I would change almost 
nothing.
	
7 - Strongly agree 
	6 - Agree 
	5 - Slightly agree 
	4 - Neither agree nor disagree 
	3 - Slightly disagree 
	2 - Disagree 
	1 - Strongly disagree

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
A-AOL-mi-sqr-ol-101-ar=+.55 p < .001
T1 life satisfaction by T1-T2; average mood.
A-AOL-mi-sqr-ol-101-ar=+.66 p < .001
T1-T2 average happiness in the moment by T2 life 
satisfaction.


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
A-AOL-mi-sqr-ol-101-aSelfreport on single question text messaged 5 times a day

How do you feel right now?
0 very positive
:
:
:
:
100 very negative


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
rPRODUCT-MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (Also "Pearson's correlation coefficient' or simply 'correlation coefficient')
Type: test statistic.
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
r = 0 no correlation ,
r = 1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with high happiness values, and
r = -1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness values.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl