Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Sporting

StudyGschwandtner et al. (2015): study GB 2012
TitleOn the Relationship between Lifestyle and Happiness in the UK.
SourcePaper for 89th Annual Conference of AES, 2015, 1 - 33, Warwick, England
URLhttp://econpapers.repec.org/paper/agsaesc15/204199.htm
Public16+ aged, general public UK, 2012
SampleProbability multistage stratified area sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =31946

Correlate
Author's labelDays walk 30 mins per week
Page in Source 15
Our classificationSporting
Operationalization
Selfreport on single question, on hpow often one walks 
30 minutes or more

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-SLW-u-sq-n-7-eb=+ p < .01
- males     +.03 (01)
- females   +.01 (01)

b's controled for:
- age
- socio-economic backgroud (parents education) 
- own education
- marital status
- employment status
- household income
- ethnicity
- region
- health behavior
  - daily consumption of fruits and vegetables
  - sporting


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-SLW-u-sq-n-7-eSelfreport on single question:

How dissatisfied or satisfied are you with your life as a whole?
1 not satisfied at all
2
3
4
5
6
7 completely satisfied


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
bREGRESSION COEFFICIENT (non-standardized) by LEAST SQUARES (OLS)
Type: test statistic
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Theoretical range: unlimited

Meaning:
b > 0 A higher correlate level corresponds with a higher happiness rating on average.
B < 0 A higher correlate level corresponds with a lower happiness rating on average.
B = 0 Not any correlation with the relevant correlate.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl