Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: What one eats

StudyConner et al. (2015): study NZ Auckland 2013
TitleOn Carrots and Curiosity: Eating Fruit and Vegetables is associated with greater Flourishing in daily Life.
SourceBritish Journal of Health Psychology , 2015, Vol. 20, 413 - 444 .
URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25080035
DOIdoi: 10.1111/bjhp.12113
PublicUniversity students, New Zealand, 2013, followed 13 days
SampleNon-probability chunk sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =405

Correlate
Author's labelconsumption of chips
Our classificationWhat one eats
Operationalization
Self report in diary of the number of servings eaten 
that days of chips: 
- potato fries, wedges, kumara chips
Observed distributionRange: 0-3; M = 0.27; SD = 0,33
Remarks
Standatd questions in the New Zealand National 
Nutrition Survey 1997 (NNS'97)

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
A-AB-md-mqr-v-5-br=-
BETWEEN persons association between average daily 
chips consumption and average mood
PA: r = -.03 (ns)
NA: r = +.13 (05)

Affect Balance not reported, but will be negative
A-AB-md-mqr-v-5-br=0
WITHIN person association between chips 
consumption and mood during the day:
PA: r = +.02 (ns)
NA: r = +.01 (ns)

Affect Balance not reported, but will be zero


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
A-AB-md-mqr-v-5-bSelfreport on 19 questions repeated 13 days

To what extent did you feel today,,
A calm
B cheerful
C pleasant
D energetic
E enthusiastic
F excited
G sad
H dejected
I depressed
J nervous
K anxious
L tense
O angry
P irritable
Q hostile

Rated
1 not at all
2
3
4
5 extremely

Computation: (A to F) - (G toQ)


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
rPRODUCT-MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (Also "Pearson's correlation coefficient' or simply 'correlation coefficient')
Type: test statistic.
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
r = 0 no correlation ,
r = 1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with high happiness values, and
r = -1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness values.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl