Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Religious (vs not)

StudyAbdel-Khalek & Lester (2018): study GB 2012
TitleSubjective Well-Being and Religiosity: Significant Associations among College Students from Egypt and the United Kingdom.
SourceInternational Journal of Culture and Mental Health, 2018, online, 1 - 7
URLhttps://doi.org/10.1080/17542863.2017.1381132
PublicUniversity students, Leicester, UK, 2012
SampleNon-probability chunk sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =205

Correlate
Author's labelReligiosity
Page in Source 2,3
Our classificationReligious (vs not)
Operationalization
Self report on single question: What is your level of 
religiosity in general?
10the maximum level score
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0 the minimum level score.

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-HL-g-sq-n-11-cr=.40 p < .001
O-SLu-g-sq-n-11-ir=.30 p < .001


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-HL-g-sq-n-11-cself report on single question: To what degree do you feel happy in general?

0 - minimum score
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 - maximum score
O-SLu-g-sq-n-11-iSelfreport on single question:

To what degree do you feel satisfied with your life in general?
10 maximum
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0 minimum


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
rPRODUCT-MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (Also "Pearson's correlation coefficient' or simply 'correlation coefficient')
Type: test statistic.
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
r = 0 no correlation ,
r = 1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with high happiness values, and
r = -1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness values.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl