Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Intrinsic motivation

StudyPassmore et al. (2018): study CA 2017
TitlePositioning Implicit Theories of Well-Being Within a Positivity Framework
SourceJournal of Happiness Studies, 2018, Vol. 19, 2445 - 2463
URLhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-017-9934-2
PublicAged 17-40, undergraduate university students, Canada, 2017
SampleNon-probability accidental sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =230

Correlate
Author's labelEudaimonic and hedonic motivation
Page in Source 248-251
Our classificationIntrinsic motivation
Operationalization
Selfreport on 10 items, e.g. 'seeking relaxation', 
'seeking to do what you believe in'. 
Respondents rated the degree that they typically 
approach their activities with each of 10 intentions. 
Rated on a 7-point scale (1= not at all to 7= very 
much).
Observed distributionEudemonic motivation: M=26.623; SD=5.01 Hedonic motivation: M=26.14; SD= 4.95
Error EstimatesEudaimonic motivation: SE b=.10 Hedonic motivation: SE b=.11
Remarks
Items not reported

Source: Hedonic and Eudaimonic Motives for Activities 
Scale (Huta 2015, Huta and Ryan 2010)

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
A-AB-cm-mq-v-5-fr=+.35 p < .001
EUDAIMONIC motivation
A-AB-cm-mq-v-5-fb=+.27 ns
A-AB-cm-mq-v-5-fBeta=+.18 ns
b and beta controlled for:
- implicit theories of well-being
- net-intrinsic motives
- hedonic motivation
- valuing happiness
- prioritizing positivity
A-AB-cm-mq-v-5-fr=+.19 p < .01
HEDONIC motivation
A-AB-cm-mq-v-5-fb=-.01 ns
A-AB-cm-mq-v-5-fBeta=-.01 ns
b and beta controlled for:
- implicit theories of well-being
- net-intrinsic motives
- eudaimonic motives
- valuing happiness
- prioritizing positivity


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
A-AB-cm-mq-v-5-fSelfreport on 12 questions

Please think of what you have been doing and experiencing during the past 4 weeks. Then report how much you experienced the following feelings;
A positive
B negative
C good
D bad
E pleasant
F unpleasant
G happy
H sad
I afraid
J joyful
K angry
L contented

Rated:
1 very rarely or never
2 rarely
3 sometimes
4 often
5 very often or always

Computation; (A+C++E+G+J+L) -(B+D+F+H+I+K)
name: Diener's Scale of Positive and negative Experience SPANE-B


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
bREGRESSION COEFFICIENT (non-standardized) by LEAST SQUARES (OLS)
Type: test statistic
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Theoretical range: unlimited

Meaning:
b > 0 A higher correlate level corresponds with a higher happiness rating on average.
B < 0 A higher correlate level corresponds with a lower happiness rating on average.
B = 0 Not any correlation with the relevant correlate.
BetaSTANDARDIZED REGRESSION COEFFICIENT by LEAST SQUARES (OLS)
Type: test statistic.

Measurement level: Correlates: all metric, Happiness: metric.
Range: [-1 ; +1]

Meaning:
beta > 0 a higher correlate level corresponds to a higher happiness rating on average.
beta < 0 a higher correlate level corresponds to a higher happiness rating on average.
beta = 0 no correlation.
beta = + 1 or -1 perfect correlation.
rPRODUCT-MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (Also "Pearson's correlation coefficient' or simply 'correlation coefficient')
Type: test statistic.
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
r = 0 no correlation ,
r = 1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with high happiness values, and
r = -1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness values.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl