Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Major life-change or not

StudyGoodhart (1985): study US 1983
TitleSome Psychological Effects Associated with Positive and Negative Thinking about Stressful Event Outcomes: Was Pollyanna Right?
SourceJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1985, Vol. 48, 216 - 232
PublicStudents in stress, followed 8 weeks, Illinois, USA, 1983
Sample
Non-Response1.7% dropout
Respondents N =173

Correlate
Author's labelStress
Page in Source 227
Our classificationMajor life-change or not
Operationalization
Stressful life-events reported between T1 and T2 
(8-week interval).
Assessed at T2 by means of an event checklist. Ss 
indicated whether or not such events had happened to 
them. 

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-DT-u-sq-v-7-arpc=-.27 p < .001
T1-T2 stress by T2 happiness, controlled for T1 
happiness.

Rpc indicates the effect of stress on CHANGE IN 
HAPPINESS.

The effect of stress on change in happiness is 
unaffected by positive or negative thinking 
(interactions ns).


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-DT-u-sq-v-7-aSelfreport on single question:

How do you feel about your life as a whole.....?
7 delighted
6 pleased
5 mostly satisfied
4 mixed
3 mostly dissatisfied
2 unhappy
1 terrible

Name: Andrews & Withey's `Delighted-Terrible Scale' (original version)


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
rpcPARTIAL CORRELATION COEFFICIENT
Type: test statistic
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning: a partial correlation between happiness and one of the correlates is that correlation, which remains after accounting for the contribution of the other influences, or some of them, to the total variability in the happiness scores.
Under that conditions
rpc > 0 a higher correlate level corresponds with a higher happiness rating,
rpc < 0 a higher correlate level corresponds with a lower happiness rating,
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl