Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Development of anomy

StudySigelman (1981): study US 1974
TitleIs Ignorance Bliss? A Reconsideration of the Folk Wisdom.
SourceHuman Relations, 1981, Vol. 34, 965 - 974
Public18+ aged, general public, USA, 1974-76
Sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =2650

Correlate
Author's labelAnomia
Page in Source 971
Our classificationDevelopment of anomy
Operationalization
The Srole (1956) anomia scale, defined as the number of 
"agree" responses to nine items which tap feelings of 
rootlessness or normlessness

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-HL-c-sq-v-3-aar=<.40 p < .01


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-HL-c-sq-v-3-aaSelfreport on single question:

Taken all together, how would you say things are these days? Would you say that you are....?
3 very happy
2 pretty happy
1 not too happy


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
rPRODUCT-MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (Also "Pearson's correlation coefficient' or simply 'correlation coefficient')
Type: test statistic.
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
r = 0 no correlation ,
r = 1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with high happiness values, and
r = -1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness values.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl