Correlational finding on Happiness and subject: Sum of negative life-events

StudyRichards et al. (1984): study US 1981
TitleThe Influence of Serious Personal Losses or Misfortunes on Life Satisfaction.
SourceJournal of Community Psychology, 1984, Vol. 12, 67 - 73
DOIDOI: 10.1002/1520-6629(198401)12:1<67::AID-JCOP2290120109>3.0.CO;2-B
Public25-59 aged, general public, USA, 1981
Sample
Non-Response
Respondents N =375

Correlate
Author's labelSerious personal loss or misfortune
Page in Source 69
Our classificationSum of negative life-events
Operationalization
Single direct question: "Have you suffered a serious 
personal loss or misfortune in the past year? Zero, 
one, two or more losses."

Observed Relation with Happiness
Happiness
Measure
StatisticsElaboration/Remarks
O-SLu-g-sq-v-3-br=-.24 p < .01
O-SLu-g-sq-v-3-br=-.24 p < .01
O-SLu-g-sq-v-3-bBeta=-.19 p < .01
 controled for physical activity, self-perceived 
health, social integration and marital status.Same 
for Blackes and Whites.


Appendix 1: Happiness measures used
CodeFull Text
O-SLu-g-sq-v-3-bSelfreport on single question:

"In general, how satisfied are you with your life.....?"
3 mostly satisfied
2 partly satisfied
1 mostly disappointed


Appendix 2: Statistics used
SymbolExplanation
BetaSTANDARDIZED REGRESSION COEFFICIENT by LEAST SQUARES (OLS)
Type: test statistic.

Measurement level: Correlates: all metric, Happiness: metric.
Range: [-1 ; +1]

Meaning:
beta > 0 a higher correlate level corresponds to a higher happiness rating on average.
beta < 0 a higher correlate level corresponds to a higher happiness rating on average.
beta = 0 no correlation.
beta = + 1 or -1 perfect correlation.
rPRODUCT-MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (Also "Pearson's correlation coefficient' or simply 'correlation coefficient')
Type: test statistic.
Measurement level: Correlate: metric, Happiness: metric
Range: [-1; +1]

Meaning:
r = 0 no correlation ,
r = 1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with high happiness values, and
r = -1 perfect correlation, where high correlate values correspond with low happiness values.
Source:
Ruut Veenhoven, World Database of Happiness, Collection of Correlational Findings, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
https://worlddatabaseofhappiness.eur.nl